Acupuncture

The number of treatments needed varies among individuals. The determining factors are the nature, severity, and history of each person’s complaint, as well as the general health and age of the individual. Usually once per week is necessary to begin with. Two treatments per week are needed in some more severe and/or chronic cases.

Many conditions can be alleviated rapidly with acupuncture and herbs, and you will feel a difference even after the first treatment. Chronic illnesses may require continuous care for several months or longer; whereas acute cases generally respond much faster. As in any form of medical care, the patient’s diet, lifestyle, determination, and contribution to their care will affect the outcome and course of treatment.

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Absolutely!

Acupuncture is for people of all ages and seniors can experience great benefits. It can assist with conditions such as insomnia, incontinence, mental clarity, restless leg syndrome, arthritis and regulation of blood pressure and diabetes.

Seniors are some of our most successful patients!

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Absolutely.

Although Chinese medicine can treat many conditions, there are many circumstances that can be dealt with more effectively by Western medicine or other healthcare practitioners. At Creative Integrations, we understand this, and we are quick to refer out when necessary.

Eastern and Western medicines are simply different approaches to the same goal—the overall health of the recipient of care. Skillful cooperation and sharing of ideas is the key to unlocking the next revolution in medicine—energy medicine.

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Acupuncture feels nothing like receiving an injection or getting blood drawn.   Acupuncture needles are very fine and flexible, about the diameter of a human hair.  Sometimes you don’t even know the needle has been inserted.  Patients find the treatments very relaxing and many fall asleep. They wake up refreshed and energized!

In the hands of a comprehensively trained acupuncturist, you are safe!  Acupuncturists are trained in the prevention of transmission of blood-borne pathogens and only use needles that are sterile and disposable

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Traditional Chinese medicine (or TCM for short), is a label that covers a broad range of traditional medicine practices spread throughout Asia, it includes acupuncture, Chinese herbs, dietary therapy, moxibustion, cupping, massage, and therapeutic exercises. The common thread among these diverse practices is a system for balancing the various functions of the body, based in Daoist principles of yin-yang that originated over 5000 years ago in regions that are now part of China. These practices are a common part of medical care throughout East Asia, accounting for roughly 75% of worldwide use, but are considered alternative medicine in the western world.

These therapies work with the body’s inherent ability to heal itself. TCM is a comprehensive system of health care with a continuous clinical history of thousands of years. TCM is traditionally based on an energetic model. The ancient Chinese recognized a vital energy behind all life forms and life processes. They called this energy Qi (pronounced “chee”). This energy flows along specific pathways called ‘meridians’. Each pathway is also associated with an organ system. Disease arises due to an imbalance of Qi in the meridians and their associated organ systems. This “Impedance”, or blockage in the harmonious flow of Qi is the root of all disease. There are hundreds of acupuncture points along the meridians, each having a specific therapeutic function.

At Creative Integrations, acupuncture and herbs are used most frequently together with dietary therapy to treat the whole body and address the underlying causes of disease.

Modern science has shown that acupuncture works by regulating the functions of the circulatory, hormonal, nervous, and musculoskeletal systems. More specifically, modern medicine is just coming back on track with discoveries made in the 1940s in the realm of quantum physics- namely, the entire universe is made of a energy (which is readily interchangeable with matter) and that thought somehow influences outcomes in the physical universe. Traditional Oriental medicine uses an intricate system of pulse and tongue diagnosis, palpation of points and meridians, medical history and other signs and symptoms to create a composite Oriental medical diagnosis. A treatment plan then guides the body to a balanced state of health. Dramatic symptom relief is often reported after the initial visit.

 

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Oriental medicine is traditionally based on an energetic model. The ancient Chinese recognized a vital energy behind all life forms and life processes. They called this energy Qi (pronounced “chee”). Qi flows along specific pathways called “meridians.” Each meridian is also associated with an organ system. There are hundreds of acupuncture points along the meridians, each having a specific therapeutic function. Disease arises due to an imbalance of Qi in the meridians and in their associated organ systems. This impedance, or blockage in the harmonious flow of Qi is the root of all disease.

Modern science has shown that acupuncture works by regulating the functions of the circulatory, hormonal, nervous, and musculoskeletal systems. More specifically, modern medicine is just coming back on track with discoveries made in the 1940s in the realm of quantum physics—namely, the entire universe is made of energy, which is readily interchangeable with matter, and that thought somehow influences outcomes in the physical universe.

Knowing that we are energy, then treating, changing, or harmonizing our vibration or vibratory frequency isn’t a far stretch. It is here wherein the genius of acupuncture must be thoroughly explored.

Traditional Oriental Medicine uses an intricate system of pulse and tongue diagnosis, palpation of points and meridians, medical history and other signs and symptoms to create a detailed Chinese medical diagnosis. A treatment plan then guides the body to a balanced state of health. Dramatic symptom relief is often reported after the initial visit.

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Now I’m going to go ahead and make a massive generalization when I say this next bit . . .

Western Medicine is concerned with and treats symptoms.

Eastern Medicine is concerned with and treats the things that cause symptoms.

If someone goes into a western doc with back pain, doc will make the pain go away with the tool s/he has (pills, surgery, manual therapy). A pill will make the person no longer feel the pain . . . but the pain is still there. Nothing has been done to treat what is causing the back pain in the first place.

Eastern folk will stay at 20,000 feet and take the back pain in to consideration along with EVERYTHING else going on with the person (job stress, food allergies, instable core, etc). Treating the whole person will include treating the ultimate cause of the ailment. Treat that and your fix is permanent (provided there is one!).

To make it real simple: 10 people walk into a western doc’s office with back pain, they all get the same (or relatively the same) treatment protocol. 10 people walk into an eastern doc’s office with back pain, they each will receive a completely different treatment strategies.

For the eastern doc, it is more important what person has the disease rather than what disease the person has. Neat.

 

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