Acupuncture

We finally updated our web presence and, well, we are pretty proud about it.

The site, of course has areas that discuss who we are and what we do (acupuncture/herbs, massage therapy, exercise physiology) but it also has a nice little area called Resources that we think you will find most useful – it breaks down into four sections: Practitioners Worth Using, Websites Worth Knowing, Books Worth Reading and Recipes Worth Making. Soon we will add a section on Living With Allergies (section on gluten, dairy, nut, soy, corn, etc free living)

Also, the site has some useful search functions. In the upper-righthand corner of every page (its ok, go ahead and look) there is a search box. Type some key words in there and you will find what you are after (provided what you are after is on our site!). But if you need paperwork or directions or that ridiculously awesome roasted nut recipe just type it into the search box and all will be well.

Lastly, there is a section called Over Tea . . . This is, essentially, our blog area. We will upload articles and interesting things all the time. Every once in a while we’ll slap it all together in a newsletter and fire it out. Should you want to receive our delightful musings in your inbox, click here to sign up for the newsletter. Overall, our posts are short, sweet and to the point! There will always be a link at the bottom for the whole article or further blitherings if you wear fancy glasses and like that kind of stuff (like us!).

Ok, do enjoy the site and if you have content you would like to see, questions you would like answered or anything else (within reason, of course) hit us up through the contact section and we will do our best to accomodate!

Thanks and welcome to the new-ish site (we actually launched it several months ago)!!!

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Yes. Acupuncture is recommended for stroke patients as soon as possible after their diagnosis, and when they are cleared by their doctor.  Acupuncture can decrease or eliminate related paralysis if it is started very soon after the incident (3 months to a year).

 

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No. Acupuncture works whether or not you think it will. Volumes of scientific research proves this.

In fact, acupuncture works very well for children and animals, most of whom probably don’t have enough awareness to “believe” in the treatment. It is always beneficial to have confidence in your physician and to maintain a positive attitude, but faith in a particular technique (or to feel it working) is not required to obtain results.

It is now known that positive expectations and belief in anything increases its effect. We encourage you to focus on that in every aspect of your life, including your treatment therapies.

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Some health insurance companies cover acupuncture treatment. You should contact your health insurance provider to verify acupuncture coverage. If they provide coverage, ask us to give you a superbill. You can submit this receipt to your insurance company, and they will reimburse you.  If you have a plan that has excellent acupuncture coverage, it may be worth it to bill for you.  Please give us a call if you have any questions

 

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With your written permission, your acupuncturist can speak to and work with your doctor directly. Most acupuncturists are interested in helping everyone understand the benefits and usefulness TCM. In most cases, physicians are unfamiliar with our treatment strategies simply because they know nothing about them.  However, there are many physicians who do understand the role of Chinese Medicine, and they regularly refer out to acupuncturists when appropriate.

 

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With regular weekly to monthly treatments, people experience higher energy levels, deeper sleep, and greater focus and ability to perform at peak levels at work and at play. Sounds too good to be true?  Try it.

The frequency of “tune-ups” depends on the over-all health of the individual. If people  exercise regularly, eat a balanced and nutritious diet, balance work and play, and have routines for de-stressing, people come in less frequently. If they are going through a particularly stressful time in their life with work, relationships or emotions, or if health problems tend to escalate seasonally (allergies, asthma, colds, holiday stress), people come in more frequently around those times. Listen to your body!

Some patients like to come in regularly for preventive care. Acupuncturists see subtle signs of disease processes and imbalances and can address these issues directly. This prevents the development of more serious health problems that require more time and financial investment to treat. These preventive-care visits are especially important for patients with long-standing, chronic conditions that tend to recur, such as back pain, headaches or allergic problems

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With regular weekly to monthly treatments, people experience higher energy levels, deeper sleep, and greater focus and ability to perform at peak levels at work and at play. Sounds too good to be true?  Try it.

The frequency of “tune-ups” depends on the over-all health of the individual. If people  exercise regularly, eat a balanced and nutritious diet, balance work and play, and have routines for de-stressing, people come in less frequently. If they are going through a particularly stressful time in their life with work, relationships or emotions, or if health problems tend to escalate seasonally (allergies, asthma, colds, holiday stress), people come in more frequently around those times. Listen to your body!

Some patients like to come in regularly for preventive care. Acupuncturists see subtle signs of disease processes and imbalances and can address these issues directly. This prevents the development of more serious health problems that require more time and financial investment to treat. These preventive-care visits are especially important for patients with long-standing, chronic conditions that tend to recur, such as back pain, headaches or allergic problems.

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Absolutely. Many patients come in for regular maintenance treatments to stay balanced and to reduce stress, and for prevention of illness and increased vitality. Acupuncturists see subtle signs of disease processes and imbalances before symptoms begin to surface. Chinese medicine effectively addresses these issues, preventing future health issues.

According to the Center for Disease Control, over 90% of all disease and illness is stress-related. Acupuncture has been proven to stimulate the opiate (or the endorphin system), which regulates the activity of the brain, decreases stress, and produces a deep state of relaxation.  Depending on your levels of stress, diet, exercise, and current state of health, anywhere from once per week to once per month is recommended for wellness and prevention.

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Yes. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs are highly effective for treating acute conditions, such as colds, flues, stomach viruses and headaches. Patients report immediate improvement in symptoms after using acupuncture or herbs. When your body is fighting off acute illness, the chronic condition usually is exacerbated. So, knock it out immediately!

The same goes for injury. If you’ve had an accident of some kind, and you hurt your neck, back, knee or elbow, call immediately. The quicker you come in to get treated, the quicker the problem will resolve.

If you are sick and have an appointment scheduled, keep it. If you’re concerned about being contagious to your practitioner, don’t be. Our commitment is to help you, no matter

 

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Yes.

If we restructured medical care so that the least invasive methods, like acupuncture, were employed first, medical costs would likely drop dramatically nationwide because much more expensive and invasive procedures would be avoided.

Likewise, invest in your health today and you won’t have to spend 100x’s as much on future emergencies (aka surgery, diabetes, cancer). Doesn’t that just make sense? Take your car in for regular tune-ups and maintenance and you are FAR less likely to get stranded on the side of the road and forced to pay a premium for a tow/mechanic . . . right?

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